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Hiram Sharp - American Patriot in the Australian Colonies

Updated: Apr 14

Hiram Sharp, an American Patriot in the Australian Colonies Terrance Patterson M.A. (Macq. Uni.), B. Ed. (Kuring-gai College of Advanced Education.)


Much has already been written about the “Patriot Wars of Upper Canada” of 1837- 38. The focus of this paper is to tell the life, after his release, of one Hiram Sharp who fought in the largest of the battles, “The Battle of the Windmill” at Prescott, Canada (November 12th to 16th 1838) and who was one of the few never to return home to the United States. Filled with patriot zeal and the promises of land, the young Hiram along with some two hundred combatants or Hunters as they referred to themselves, braved the cold night of the twelfth of November to cross the Niagara River aboard the “Charlotte of Toronto”. The original plan was to drift downstream to the Prescott wharf and disembark for a surprise attack on Fort Wellington. This action they believed would induce a general uprising of the Canadian populace, against the British, thus ultimately bringing about freedom from what they perceived as the oppressive forces of the Empire.


These grand plans were not to come to fruition. Nearing midnight, the small force of two schooners, the “Charlotte of Toronto” and the “Charlotte of Oswego” pulled by the steamship, “United States” were set adrift on the current. As they approached the patriots were noticed by a customs inspector, who raised the alarm. In the ensuring confusion the schooners continue to drift and the vessel that contained much of the supplies, the “Charlotte of Oswego” became grounded in the shallows at the entrance of the Oswegatchie River. The “Charlotte of Toronto” with the invading force continued until it made the Canadian shore near Prescott. (Scott 73) 1.


Above the landing place, on a bluff, stood an imposing stone tower about eighteen metres high that was used as a windmill. Here the men decided to make their stand, protected by its strong walls, and feeling certain that democracy based on the United States model would eventually be found throughout North America.


Knowing that such a hostile action on Canadian soil would be attempted, the British had made plans for repelling just such an invasion. Word of the landing was quickly carried to the authorities and within a short time British armed forces and militia began moving towards the windmill. The crucial battle that was to decide the future of so many was about to begin.

By sunrise on Tuesday, 13th November the patriots keeping lookout noticed a substantial military force approaching. This combined force numbered over two thousand British army regulars and Canadian militia, supported by gunships on the river. The British force was also supplied with artillery to pound the invaders into oblivion.


The sight of such a force did not weaken the resolve of the patriots. Instead upon the opening of the attack, the patriots met with success repulsing the British with the use of superior small arms, aided also by their strong defensive position. One major advantage that the Hunters had over the British was that many were armed with rifles that were capable of greater range and accuracy, rather than the smooth bore musket. (Graves 111) 2. Even the British artillery failed to penetrate the windmill’s strong walls. But this early victory only displayed the precarious position that the patriot force found themselves in; without reinforcements and supplies their position would eventually become untenable.


Late in the afternoon of that day, Nils von Schoultz, the patriot commander, attempted to send some men back across the river to Ogdensburg to try to gain medical supplies and food for his fighting men. The small force of patriots that held the windmill had noted that the British vessels occasionally interrupted their patrols to return to Prescott, leaving the river clear for brief periods. At such a timely interlude volunteer numbering about four tried to reach the U.S shore. Unfortunately, this small band of brave men was captured on the arrival of a British gunship. There is the distinct possibility that when these men were captured within United States territorial waters. (Graves 126) 3.


From this moment it was just a matter of time; the British strengthened their military position, aided by heavier artillery and the arrival of more men. They, the British made sure that none could escape the encircling force. Finally due to the lack of supplies the patriot commander, Nils von Schoultz was forced to surrender. One can only imagine the sense of depression that faced each of the patriots at their failed attempt to bring Canada freedom, based on the United States model, especially when each of these men including Hiram were able to see their homeland in the distance.


This failed action was to change the lives of each of the patriots forever. Some such as the patriot commander paid with his life, whilst others such as Hiram who were initially sentenced to Death, had their sentences commuted to Life Imprisonment, at the ends of the British Empire, in the far-flung colony of Van Diemen’s Land.


Upon his capture Hiram along with the others was first incarcerated at Fort Wellington. Finally, after the trials, the patriots were moved on until after many months they were placed on board, “HMS Buffalo”, a ship that had earlier in its career had transported the first free settlers to South Australia. The voyage was a horrendous experience, as they had to endure a severe tropical storm off the coast of South America. Many were sick and they were restricted to life below deck for long periods in claustrophobic conditions, in the heat and with the ship rolling about them. Land when it did come must have been a relief.


What has since been discovered about Hiram is quite interesting. He was born in about 1815. Yet no birth certificate has been found, but his Death Certificate records him as being forty-four years of age at the time of his death in 1859. As to where he was born this has not been verified, but what is known is that his parents, Philario Sharp and Rebecca Sharp, nee Richmond are recorded in the 1850 Census as residing in Clay, Onondaga County, in the State of New York.


Hiram’s forebears can be traced to Thomas Rogers who arrive on board the “Mayflower” in 1620. His connection to the “Mayflower” is traced through his mother’s line, (see Appendix 1). Hiram was one of at least eight children.


The Sharp lineage itself can be traced back to at least Robert Sharp who died in July 1653 at Muddy River, Suffolk, Massachusetts, (see Appendix 2). The family is among the oldest migrant families to reach the New World.


Like most Australians I had no knowledge of the “Patriot Wars”. The fact that we have a municipal area in Sydney known as “The City of Canada Bay” and three bays known as Canada Bay, Exile Bay and France Bay in Sydney Harbour did not register an interest, except for a thought that these were strange names for areas in Sydney. I was later to learn that this was where the French-Canadian Patriots who were involved in the conflicts were incarcerated. The Lieutenant Governor of Upper Canada, George William Arthur, sent the American Patriots to Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) on the same ship, “Buffalo”. What is interesting is that the British authorities off loaded the U.S. patriots in Hobart, whilst sending the French Canadians on to Sydney. Luckily, “Buffalo” survived to carry out its mission of delivering the Patriots. After leaving Sydney the ship sailed to New Zealand and had the misadventure of sinking.


My personal interest in Hiram Sharp, one of the ninety-two Americans sent to Tasmania, extends from being the husband of Margaret who happens to be the great, great, granddaughter of Hiram. Our children and grandchild are also descendants. For many years my wife had expressed an interest in exploring her background and finding out about her family history, not knowing of the interesting story that was about to unfold.


The catalyst for the beginnings of my research was a family reunion in Mitchell, Queensland in 1999, in which Margaret's mother, Gwendoline attended. At this reunion the attendees were each given some, “Family History Notes”. Armed with this sparse information and with the sudden and unexpected death of Margaret’s mother in 2005, I set out upon my quest to seek a more detailed historical account of Hiram Sharp's life.


Other previous historians who researched and wrote about Hiram's life assumed, incorrectly, that on receiving his "Ticket of Leave" and then being released, he returned to the States aboard the U.S.S. “Belle” which left Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) on September 2nd, 1845.

Indeed, Hiram spent some time working on the “Belle”, under the command of Captain Ichabod Handy; with I believe the intention of returning home. The “Belle” finally returned to Fairhaven, Massachusetts on September 10th, 1852, minus Hiram who, it was subsequently discovered left the whaling ship in Sydney, Australia. Unfortunately, I have not been able to locate the “Belle’s” log to learn more of the voyage and crew.


The family knew that Hiram met a newly widowed Irish lady named Mary Ann Black nee Casey, who already had four children. Where and how they met remains a mystery. According to a family story Mary Ann arrived in Sydney on a ship bearing her name. This ship reportedly was, “The biggest floating scow you ever saw, with cockroaches as big as mice.”4.

Margaret’s cousin, Paul Sharpe began searching the “Mariners and Ships in Australian Waters”5. State Records Authority of New South Wales and one possibility came to light. On the 21st of May 1849, a ship “Mary Ann” of 394 tons arrived in Sydney from Adelaide. Coincidently two days later the 23rd, “Belle” on a whaling voyage also arrived in Sydney. Mary is not listed as being a passenger, but it is possible that she could have boarded at Wollongong, N.S.W where she had been residing with her young family, for the short voyage to Sydney. This would have been the easiest way to reach Sydney in that era, as travelling overland would have been very difficult, if not horrendous.


I know that this is only an assumption, but it is a tantalizing possibility. It does say something of the calibre of the man, when one considers that he was prepared to take on a wife who already had four children.


Again, according to family history, Hiram and Mary Ann were married in Sydney in 1850; yet no “marriage certificate” has been discovered. This is after many fruitless searches of the “New South Wales Dept. of Births, Deaths and Marriages.” I believe that the marriage was in name only; a practice that in Australia at the time was not unusual. Even in the 21st Century it does not seem out of place.


According to oral history, (“Family History Notes”), Hiram had arrived in Australia from America on board a whaling ship in company with one Ben Boyd. In this oral version it was believed that Hiram may have been a convict at some stage. To verify this version, I initially began searching the records of convicts sent to New South Wales. There, of course, was no record of a Hiram Sharp. Fortunately, I thought of the convict records for Van Diemen’s Land, as it was a separate entity in the general administration of the convict system. Having accessed the Tasmanian Records, Hiram’s name appeared and his life's background and involvement in the "Battle of the Windmill" in Canada began to unfold.


This information together with the family's historical notes led to the discovery of records about his sentence, journey to Australia on board “Buffalo” from Canada, his time in Van Diemen’s Land and subsequent release and joining the whaling ship, “Belle”. Much of this information was found in the New South Wales State Library, Tasmanian Collection. These details have also been researched by other historians and can be perused in their publications.


I then turned to these published accounts to find out more about the “Patriot Wars” from such historians as: Stuart D. Scott (2004), Cassandra Pybus and Hamish Maxwell-Stewart (2002), Donald E. Graves (2002) and many articles written by John C. Carter. All assumed that Hiram had returned to the U.S. on board “Belle” and disappeared from history, as there were no records of his whereabouts and life in the States.


However, records did exist, but in areas that had not been contemplated by researchers, such as in the New South Wales Lands Department, also New South Wales Births, Deaths and Marriages, Coronial Inquests and “Account of Sheep at Maneroo, 1st June to 30th May 1867” and “Boyd and Co. Account Book and Order List, 21st July 1851 to 28th May 1867”6. (This is part of the Burnima Station Records, held in the National Library in Canberra).

It was surprising to find, how “accurate” the family oral history had been. Indeed, Hiram had been a convict; he had arrived from America and on a whaling ship, at least from Tasmania. But what if anything is the significance of the story of Ben Boyd?


From this point onwards the life of Hiram can be traced with greater accuracy. Research shows, Mary and Hiram’s first-born son was Milo Richmond, born on the 21st of November 1852 and he was baptized at Nimmitabel, New South Wales on the 25th of January 1853. In all, Hiram and Mary had five children: Milo Richmond, Rebecca Jane, Michael Charles, Hiram Morgan, and Catherine Elizabeth. A baby girl died in 1855.


Hiram finally gained employment on a large sheep station named “Bibbenluke” as a shepherd. This is where the Ben Boyd part of the story evolves. Ben Boyd purchased the property in about 1843. He was one of the largest landowners in New South Wales, around the Monaro area until his death in 1851. After this William Bradley, one of the largest and wealthiest landholders in New South Wales bought the lease and stock in 1855.7.

This sheep station is in southern New South Wales between Nimmitabel and Bombala. At the time these two villages were about as remote as you could get on the Australian mainland.


Hiram's first appointment was at an outstation named “Dog Kennel” (Probably this is a rather appropriate name for an isolated area). Here we have records of him signing for supplies, payment, and the records of sheep under his care in June 1851. These records are found in the “Burnima Station Records”8. These records are in the Australian National Library in Canberra.


In 1851 it is recorded that eighteen different shepherds were employed during the year (between nine and twelve shepherds employed at one time, tending to thirteen to fourteen flocks). About half of this number are recorded as being literate, among them Hiram.9.

Working as a shepherd was extremely hard in an area without fences, caring for flocks of between two thousand and three thousand sheep. The climate of this remote area ranged from extremely hot in summer to freezing conditions and snow in the winter months, as it is so close to the Snowy Mountains. Coming from the far northern area of New England in the United States, Hiram would have been used to such weather conditions.

From these lowly beginnings he advanced to general work hand (June 1852) to the better paid position of carrier in March, 1853.10.


After working for many years at “Bibbenluke”, Hiram and Mary managed to obtain a property of eighty-three acres near Bombala at a place known as Crankies (Cranky’s) Plains on the 28th of July, 1857.11. The cost for the property was eighty- three pounds. The property is considered as one of the best in the district with the Coolumbooka River flowing through and it was here, using bullock teams Hiram continued as a carrier around the district.


Unfortunately for this patriot, life was not to have the fairytale ending. He had achieved so much of what he had hoped for: a family and a property, undergone many trials and tribulations throughout his life, but whilst in a state of “intemperance”12. he accidently fell from a bullock hauled dray as he was crossing the Coolumbooka River and was killed within sight of his property on the 19th of February 1859.


According to the official record from “New South Wales Births, Deaths and Marriages” Hiram is buried in an unmarked grave at Nimmitabel. Unfortunately, there is another earlier record that has him being laid to rest at Bombala Cemetery, which leaves one wondering as to which is correct. Due to the fact it was the height of summer it would be unusual at the time to keep a body above the ground for any length of time, as refrigerators did not exist for preservation purposes, unless it was being transported over some distance. Nimmitabel is at least fifty kilometres [a day’s travel] from Crankies Plains, whereas Bombala is within walking distance. This would help to explain why Hiram was interred two days later the twenty-first of February. Nimmitabel also held some significance to the family, as this was where Hiram’s children were baptized.


As a family we have wondered as to the reasons why Hiram would have involved himself in the “Patriot Wars”. We have speculated that Hiram’s two grandfathers, both Nathaniel Richmond and Daniel Sharp may have had some bearing on his decision, as both had fought against the British in the Revolutionary Wars in the United States and as such, they were patriots for the cause of freedom.


In hindsight it was both Canada and Australia’s gain that such men as Hiram and the other patriots risked their lives for freedom. After the troubles of the “Patriot War”, the British authorities started to reassess how they were administrating both colonies and it became clear to at least some in authority that there had to be some movement towards granting democratic reforms.


It can be stated that Hiram was lured by the hope of helping the Canadians to break from the British yoke, just as the States had been able to do and gain their own independence, a totally free New World. As well as this, it can be speculated that Hiram would have been hoping to gain land as a reward in helping to overthrow the British. With these intentions unfulfilled in North America, this young man forged another path in another British Colony at the far ends of the earth and helped to bring about the form of democracy that both Canada and Australia share and enjoy today.


Notes

1. Scott, Stuart D. “To the Outskirts of Habitable Creation: Americans and Canadians Transported to Tasmania in the 1840’s” Lincoln 2004, pg.73

2. Graves, Donald. “Guns Across the River: The Battle of the Windmill, 1838” Friends of Windmill Point, Prescott 2002, pg. 111

3. Ibid., pg.126

4. James, Elsie. “Family History Notes” Charleville 4th September 1993.

5. State Records Authority of N.S.W. “Mariners and Ships in Australian Waters May 1849’,http://mariners.records.nsw.gov.au/1849/05/4905.htm

6.” Burnima Station Records”, National Library of Australia, MSS 1154, 1999

7. Dawson, Barbara. “Sheep and Shepherds on Bibbenluke 1851-1867” Bombala and District Historical Society 1996, pg.1

8.” Burnima Station Records”, op cite.

9. Ibid.

10. Ibid.

11. New South Wales Department of Lands “Land Purchase 57/2285” 1857

12. New South Wales “Coronial Inquests” 1859

Appendixes

Appendix 1

Descendants of Thomas Rogers

Generation No. 1

1. THOMAS ROGERS was born about 1572 in Watford, Northampton, England. He was the son of WILLIAM ROGERS and ELEANOR. He married ALICE COSFORD, the daughter of GEORGE COSFORD on the 24th October 1597, Watford, Northampton, England He sailed on “The Mayflower” with his son, JOSEPH in 1620, leaving his wife and rest of family in Leiden, Holland where he had earlier been a merchant. He died at Plymouth the first winter, leaving behind his eighteen-year-old son, JOSEPH.

Children of THOMAS ROGERS and ALICE COSFORD are:

i. THOMAS (died young)

2. ii. RICHARD (died young)

iii. JOSEPH

3. iv. JOHN

v ELIZABETH

vi MARGARET

Generation No. 2

3. JOHN ROGERS (THOMAS ROGERS 1) was baptised 6 April 1606 at Watford, Northampton, England. He married ANNA CHURCHMAN, at Plymouth 16 April 1639. He died at Duxbury between the 26 August and 20 September 1692.

Children of JOHN ROGERS and ANNA CHURCHMAN are:

6. i. JOHN b. ca. 1640

7. ii. (H)ANNA b. bet. 1640 and 1650.

8. iii. ABIGAIL b. ca. 1640 (based on age at death).

9. iv. ELIZABETH b. bef. 1652

Generation No. 3

8. ABIGAIL ROGERS (JOHN2, ROGERS, THOMAS1) was born 1640 in Massachusetts, USA, and died 1 August 1727, ae. 86 yrs. in Taunton. She married by 1663 JOHN RICHMOND, b. ca. 1627: son of John Richmond d. Taunton 7 Oct 1715 ae. 88 yrs. in 1654 in Massachusetts, USA. All the children were born in Taunton, except EBENEZER.

Children of ABIGAIL ROGERS and JOHN RICHMOND are:

9. i. JOSEPH b. 8 Dec. 1663

10. ii. EDWARD b. 8 Feb. 1665

11. iii. SAMUEL b. 23 Sept. 1668

12. iv. SARAH b. 26 Feb. 1670

13. v. JOHN b. 5 Dec. 1673

14. vi. EBENEZER b. Newport RI 12 May 1676

15. vii. ABIGAIL b. 26 Feb. 1678/9

Generation No. 4

10. EDWARD4 RICHMOND (ABIGAIL3, JOHN2, ROGERS, THOMAS1) was born 8 February 1665 in Taunton, Massachusetts, USA, and died 9 December 1741 in Massachusetts, USA. He married MERCY (MARY). She was born in 1709 in Taunton, Massachusetts, USA.

Children of EDWARD RICHMOND and MERCY (MARY) are:

16. i. MERCY b.ca. 1694; d. 27 Jan. 1760

17. ii. EDWARD b.ca. 1696

18. iii. JOSIAH b. ca. 1697

19. iv. NATHANIEL b. ca. 1700; d. bet. 1739 and 1744.

20. v. SETH

21. vi. ELIZABETH

22. vii. PHEBE b. ca. 1713

23. viii. SARAH

23. ix. MARY d. after 1738

24. x. PRISCILLA

Generation No. 5

18. JOSIAH5 RICHMOND (EDWARD4 RICHMOND, ABIGAIL3 ROGERS, JOHN2,THOMAS ROGERS1) was born 1697 in Taunton, Bristol, Massachusetts, and died 30 January 1763 in Middleboro, Plymouth, Massachusetts. He married MEHITABLE DEANE (1) b. Taunton 6 or 9 June 1697; daughter of Benjamin and Sarah (Williams) Deane in 1736 in Massachusetts. She died 5 February 1745.

He married (2) LYDIA CROCKER in Middleboro 6 Feb. 1745/6

Children of JOSIAH RICHMOND and MEHITABLE DEANE are:

25. i. MARY b. 1718

26. ii. JOSIAH b. 1721

27. iii. GERSHOM b. 1723

28. iv. GEORGE b. 1725

29 v. BENJAMIN b. 1727

30 vi. LEMUEL b. 1733

31. vii. MIRIAM b. 1733

32. viii. EPHRAIM b. 12 Feb. 1735

33. ix. ELEAZER b. 27 Feb. 1737

34. x. ZERIAH b. 1739

35. xi. MERCY b. 1741

Generation No. 6

26. JOSIAH6 RICHMOND 11 (JOSIAH5, EDWARD4 RICHMOND, ABIGAIL3 JOHN, 2ROGERS, THOMAS1) was born 1711 in, Massachusetts and died 1786, Massachusetts. He married ELIZABETH SMITH, on the 9 July 1743. She was born 1716 and died about 1803.

Child of JOSIAH RICHMOND and ELIZABETH SMITH is:

36.. i. NATHANIAL8

Generation No. 7

36. NATHANIAL7 RICHMOND (JOSIAH6 RICHMOND 11 JOSIAH5, EDWARD4 RICHMOND, ABIGAIL3 JOHN, 2 ROGERS, THOMAS1) was born 13 April, 1766 in Taunton, Massachusetts. He married MARY HORSWELL, who was born in 1770, Tauton, Massachusetts.

Child of NATHANIAL RICHMOND and MARY HORSWELL is:

37. i. REBECCA

37. REBECCA8 RICHMOND (NATHANIAL7 RICHMOND,JOSIAH6 RICHMOND 11 JOSIAH5, EDWARD4RICHMOND, ABIGAIL,3 JOHN, 2, ROGERS, THOMAS1) was born 6 June, 1783 in Taunton, Massachusetts and died 17 November, 1855 in Clay, New York. She married PHILARIO SHARP.

More About PHILARIO SHARP:

Census: 1830, Town of Salina

Notes (Facts Pg): Typed names on census includes Philaris, Philarie,Pilario

Children of PHILARIO SHARP and REBECCA RICHMOND are:

38. i. REBECCA SHARP, b. 1805, Taunton, Bristol, Ma.

39. ii. AMANDA SHARP, b. 1807

40. iii. DANIEL SHARP, b. 1809

41. iv.HIRAM8 SHARP, b. 1811, New York; d. 19 February 1859, Cranky's Plains (Bombala - District).

42. v. POLLY SHARP, b. 1813

43. vi. HORACE SHARP, b. 1815

44. vii. MILO SHARP, b. 1817

45. viii. ABIGAIL SHARP, b. 1819

Generation No. 9

41. HIRAM9 SHARP (REBECCA8 RICHMOND, NATHANIAL7 RICHMOND,JOSIAH6 RICHMOND 11 JOSIAH5, EDWARD4 RICHMOND, ABIGAIL,3 JOHN, 2 ROGERS, THOMAS1)was born 1811or 1815(According to Death Certificate) in State of New York and died 19 February 1859 in Cranky's Plains (Bombala - District). He married MARY ANN CASEY 1849 in Kiama, (Though no Marriage Certificate has been found) daughter of MICHAEL CASEY and JOHANNA HAFEY. She was born Bef. 1822 in Kilfinnane, Limerick, Ireland, and died 17 January 1896 in Charleville QLD.

Notes for HIRAM SHARP:

During Hiram's life all his children’s' births were registered with no 'E' in Sharp. Only after his death did the 'E' seem to creep in with his death certificate and marriages of his children.

According to Dr. John Carter, Ministry of Heritage and Culture, Toronto, Canada, Hiram was only one of three Americans to remain in Australia. The other two being: Ira Polley and James Aitchison.

More About HIRAM SHARP:

Burial: 21 February 1859, Nimitybelle NSW

Cause of Death 19 February 1859, Fall from a dray

Convict info: Captured at the “Battle of Windmill” Prescott 13- 16 November 1838 in Canada and sent to Van Dieman’s Land for life. Arrived in Tasmania, 12 February 1840.

Extra Inform: Captured at 'The Battle of Windmill' while fighting for Canadian Independence against the British

Occupation: Carrier Undertaker: 19 February 1859, No undertaker

Appendix 2

Descendants of Richard Sharpe

Generation No. 1

1. RICHARD1 SHARPE was born Abt. 1562 in Islington, Norfolk, England, and died Abt. 1627. He married ELIZABETH CHADWICK, daughter of JEFFERYE CHADWICK. She was born 7 June 1571 in Halifax, Yorkshire, England.

Children of RICHARD SHARPE and ELIZABETH CHADWICK are:

2. i. ROBERT2 SHARPE, b. 1615, Islington, Norfolk, England; d. July 1653, Muddy River, Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA.

ii. WILLIAM SHARPE.

iii. ALICE SHARPE.

iv. ELIZABETH SUSANNAH SHARPE.

Generation No. 2

2. ROBERT2 SHARPE (RICHARD1) was born 1615 in Islington, Norfolk, England, and died July 1653 in Muddy River, Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA. He met ABIGAIL WRIGHT 1640 in Roxbury, Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA, daughter of RICHARD WRIGHT and MARGARET WRIGHT. She was born Abt. 1620 in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA, and died Abt. 1707 in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, USA.

Children of ROBERT SHARPE and ABIGAIL WRIGHT are:

3. i. JOHN3 SHARP, b. 12 March 1647/48, Muddy River, Boston, Massachusetts, USA; d. 21 April 1676, Sudbury, Massachusetts, USA.

ii. ABIGAIL SHARP, b. 1647, Dorchester, Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA.

iii. MARY SHARP, b. 5 December 1652, Roxbury, Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA.

Generation No. 3

3. JOHN3 SHARP (ROBERT2 SHARPE, RICHARD1) was born 12 March 1647/48 in Muddy River, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, and died 21 April 1676 in Sudbury, Massachusetts, USA. He met MARTHA VOSE 1665 in Massachusetts, USA, daughter of ROBERT VOSE and JANE MOSS. She was born 1645 in Ditton, Lancashire, England, and died 1683 in Muddy River, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Children of JOHN SHARP and MARTHA VOSE are:

4. i. WILLIAM4 SHARP, b. 10 March 1673/74, Roxbury, Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA; d. 19 November 1751, Pomfret, Windham, Connecticut.

ii. ROBERT SHARP, b. 17 May 1665.

iii. MARTHA SHARP, b. 4 June 1667, Brookline, Norfolk, Massachusetts, USA.

iv. JOHN SHARP, b. 1669, Muddy River, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

v. ELIZABETH SHARP, b. Abt. 1669, Muddy River, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Generation No. 4

4. WILLIAM4 SHARP (JOHN3, ROBERT2 SHARPE, RICHARD1) was born 10 March 1673/74 in Roxbury, Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA, and died 19 November 1751 in Pomfret, Windham, Connecticut. He met ABIGAIL WHITE 1703 in Pomfret, Windham, Connecticut, USA. She was born Abt. 1676, and died 15 February 1753.

Children of WILLIAM SHARP and ABIGAIL WHITE are:

5. i. SOLOMON5 SHARP, b. 23 February 1704/05, Brookline, Norfolk, Massachusetts, USA; d. 2 May 1783, Pomfret, Windham, Connecticut.

ii. ABIGAIL SHARP, b. 29 March 1700.

iii. JOHN SHARP, b. 14 July 1703.

iv. WILLIAM SHARP, b. 23 February 1704/05.

v. MARTHA SHARP, b. 7 May 1708.

vi. JOSEPH SHARP, b. 1711.

vii. BENJAMIN SHARP, b. 1 November 1713.

viii. ISSAC SHARP, b. 23 May 1716.

ix. ELIZABETH SHARP, b. 5 May 1718.

x. GERSHOM SHARP, b. 15 May 1720.

Generation No. 5

5. SOLOMON5 SHARP (WILLIAM4, JOHN3, ROBERT2 SHARPE, RICHARD1) was born 23 February 1704/05 in Brookline, Norfolk, Massachusetts, USA, and died 2 May 1783 in Pomfret, Windham, Connecticut. He married SARAH GOODALE, daughter of THOMAS GOODELL and SARAH HORRELL. She was born 27 August 1711 in Pomfret, Windham, Connecticut.

Child of SOLOMON SHARP and SARAH GOODALE is:

6. i. DANIEL6 SHARP, b. 12 June 1754, Pomfret, Windham, Connecticut; d. 21 August 1840.

Generation No. 6

6. DANIEL6 SHARP (SOLOMON5, WILLIAM4, JOHN3, ROBERT2 SHARPE, RICHARD1) was born 12 June 1754 in Pomfret, Windham, Connecticut, and died 21 August 1840. He met JEMINA SHAY EASTMAN 6 April 1781 in Barnard, Rutland, Vermont. She was born 1766 in Barnard, Rutland, Vermont, and died 7 May 1845.

Children of DANIEL SHARP and JEMINA EASTMAN are:

7. i. PHILARIO7 SHARP, b. 1784, Barnard, Vt.

ii. DANIEL SHARP, b. 3 July 1787, Barnard, Windsor, Vermont; d. 13 August 1862, South Bend, St Joseph, In.

Generation No. 7

7. PHILARIO7 SHARP (DANIEL6, SOLOMON5, WILLIAM4, JOHN3, ROBERT2 SHARPE, RICHARD1) was born 1784 in Barnard, Vt. He married REBECCA RICHMOND, daughter of NATHANIEL RICHMOND and MARY HORSWELL. She was born 6 June 1783 in Taunton, Bristol, MA, and died 17 November 1855 in Clay, NY.

More About PHILARIO SHARP:

Census: 1830, Town of Salina

Notes (Facts Pg): Typed names on census includes Philaris, Philarie,Pilario

Children of PHILARIO SHARP and REBECCA RICHMOND are:

i REBECCA SHARP, b. 1805, Taunton, Bristol, Ma.

ii. AMANDA SHARP, b. 1807

iii.. DANIEL SHARP, b. 1809

8. iv. HIRAM8 SHARP, b. 1811, New York d. 19 February 1859, Cranky's Plains (Bombala - District).

v.POLLY SHARP, b. 1813

vi. HORACE SHARP, b. 1815

vii. MILO SHARP, b. 1817

viii. ABIGAIL SHARP, b. 1819

Generation No. 8

8. HIRAM8 SHARP (PHILARIO7, DANIEL6, SOLOMON5, WILLIAM4, JOHN3, ROBERT2 SHARPE, RICHARD1) was born 1811or 1815(According to Death Certificate) in State of New York and died 19 February 1859 in Cranky's Plains (Bombala - District). He married MARY ANN CASEY 1849 in Kiama, (Though no Marriage Certificate has been found) daughter of MICHAEL CASEY and JOHANNA HAFEY. She was born Bef. 1822 in Kilfinnane, Limerick, Ireland, and died 17 January 1896 in Charleville QLD.

Notes for HIRAM SHARP:

During Hiram's life all his children’s' births were registered with no 'E' in Sharp. Only after his death did the 'E' seem to creep in with his death certificate and marriages of his children.

More About HIRAM SHARP:

Burial: 21 February 1859, Nimitybelle NSW

Cause of Death (Facts Pg): 19 February 1859, Fall from a dray

Convict info: 1839, Captured at the Battle of Windmill in Canada and sent to Van Dieman’s Land for life. Arrived in Tasmania in 1840.

Extra Inform: Captured at 'The Battle of Windmill' while fighting for Canadian Independence against the British

Occupation: Carrier

Undertaker: 19 February 1859, No undertaker

Figure1. Hiram Sharp Figure 2. Mary Ann nee Casey (Photos in family collection)



Figure 1. Hiram Sharp Figure 2. Mary Ann nee Casey

(Photos in family collection)




Bibliography

” Burnima Station Records”, National Library of Australia, MSS 1154, 1999.

Dawson, Barbara. “Sheep and Shepherds on Bibbenluke 1851-1867” Bombala and District Historical Society 1996.

Graves, Donald. “Guns Across the River: The Battle of the Windmill, 1838” Friends of Windmill Point, Prescott 2002.

James, Elsie. “Family History Notes” Charleville, 4th September 1993.

New South Wales, Department of Births, Deaths, and Marriages

New South Wales “Coronial Inquests” 1859.

New South Wales Department of Land “Land Purchase 57/2285” 1857.

Pybus, Cassandra and Maxwell-Stewart, Hamish “American Citizens, British Slaves: Yankee Political Prisoners in an Australian Penal Colony 1839-1850” Melbourne 2002.

Scott, Stuart D. “To the Outskirts of Habitable Creation: Americans and Canadians Transported to Tasmania in the 1840’s” Lincoln 2004

State Records Authority of N.S.W. “Mariners and Ships in Australian Waters May 1849’, http://mariners.records.nsw.gov.au/1849/05/4905.htm

An American Patriot in the Australian Colonies Mayflower Society (2)
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Margaret Patterson touching the wall of the Windmill (with permission) at Prescott in 2015, one hundred and seventy-seven years after the battle.



Margaret and Terrance Patterson at the Syracuse Library reading Joshua Bailey Richmond's book on the Richmond Family.


Some of the N.S.W. descendants of Hiram at a family reunion in 2017.



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